Projects

Keeping up with the Joneses

fast facts

Project: Water Authority of Western Nassau Iron Removal Project

Client: Water Authority of Western Nassau County

Size: 7.0 MGD

Services provided: Iron filtration system design, connection to sanitary sewer, architectural design of new treatment building

Keeping up with the Joneses

At the Water Authority of Western Nassau County’s (WAWNC) Plants 28 and 30, 7.0 MGD of potable drinking water is supplied to consumers through a series of four groundwater wells. Iron concentrations at both plants had exceeded the established standard and rendered the existing treatment ineffective. The presence of iron in the groundwater had also severely impacted the well itself, leading to a considerable reduction in capacity. WAWNC made the decision to install an iron treatment system to remove the iron from the groundwater—keeping in mind that the site in question was located in the middle of a residential neighborhood.

Sand filtration technology is a proven, cost-effective approach for the removal of iron from drinking water. WAWNC elected to install a pressurized sand filtration system that would be fully automated, which simplifies operations and requires only routine maintenance from plant personnel.

To situate this plant in the residential neighborhood, all aspects of the plant, including filters, the control room, chemical storage, piping and equipment, were designed to blend in, utilizing features consistent with surrounding properties. Sustainable design elements such as LED lighting and cementitious siding were included to lessen the project’s impact on the environment.

The end result since start-up has been iron-free water, reducing rusty water complaints and ensuring a clean, reliable source of drinking water to WAWNC’s customers for years to come. The completed design met and exceeded the client’s desire for a sustainably-oriented facility that blends in with the existing neighborhood. The automated controls of the facility will continue to add to the cost efficiency of this plant.

Share

Careers   News   Blog
Facebook Twitter Instagram LinkedIn YouTube Google Plus Pinterest Tumblr